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Parkour through of art today – Expanded cinema

EXPANDED CINEMA. Journalist Gene Youngblood published Expanded Cinema in 1970, heralding the extensive possibilities offered by experimental cinema thanks to the new technologies. According to the author, cinema could be made using three media: traditional celluloid, video and computer. This was not about creating new contents, but new contexts for viewing it. Thus, expanded cinema was able to work through interactivity and cross the threshold of other disciplines to become a hybrid cinema based on its surroundings.

 

In this genre, in 1971 filmmaker Michael Snow remade his film entitled La région centrale into a video installation. The difference in the projected medium seeks to devaluate the meaning of images so as to favour the processing and viewing. This led to Jean Christophe Royoux describing “exhibition cinema” as that in which a new relationship is established with the viewer. This concept has led to the expression “screen art” which includes the work of artists and filmmakers who use moving images in an exhibition hall. The configuration of a production area can radically transform the conditions of a series of images.

 

Artists and filmmakers work by analysing the convergence of photography and cinema and modifying the way these are projected, creating new viewing areas or renewing the models of cinematographic narrative. Chantal Akerman turned her film entitled D’Est (1993) into an installation which combined the continuous screening of her film with video monitors which show isolated sequences and another with the filmmaker’s voice. In 24 hour Psycho (1993) artist Douglas Gordon slows down a video of Hitchcock’s mythical film Psychosis so that it lasts a whole day. These are works where the institution of cinematography meets art and art meets cinema.

 

In the project entitled Spartacus File-The Collectivists Artist Xavier Arenós implausibly connects the history of the collectivization in 1936 of an old textile factory in the town of Granollers, which was confiscated and collectivized by the workers and given the name Espartaco (Spartacus). This story was crossed with the novel entitled Spartacus written by Howard Fast and the film by Kubrick based on the same novel. The projection screen works like an exhibition display and an agglutinating element. On this screen one can see La mort del cavall (Death of a Horse) (single channel video, 2min 30seg) with an excerpt of the original soundtrack from the film Spartacus (S. Kubrick, 1960) composed by Alex North. The video-graphical material superimposes different images and sounds to expand the symbolic nature of a historical story about the fight against oppression and the freedom of slaves.

 

Imagen 1

Xavier Arenós. Archivo Espartaco-Los colectivizadores, 2008

 

 

 

PARKOUR (FREERUNNING). A DICTIONARY OF ART TODAY

Like an urban parkour circuit among words, concepts, theories and keys to art, this dictionary does not follow the established routes but drifts through today’s art leaping between the semantic topography that defines and conceptualizes art productions. The journey is free-flowing, with no rules or hazards. It is based on one’s own trust as a reader.

Simplicity contrasted with complexity. This is what motivates the dictionary-circuit through the concepts of art today, along these obstacles of words and expressions that surround the world of art. Leaping and moving forward.

It is only something a bit different, a skilful stimulating journey through the linguistic and urban circuits of art in our days.

A number of obstacles to throw out and take on our journey:

Abject / SOCIAL ZOMBIE-IZATION / APPROPRIATION / IRONY / THEATRE OF THE ABSURD / VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY / kitsch / AXIOM / URBAN INTERVENTION / ARCHETYPE / BIO-POLITICS / CHARGE / BRAND / ARCHITECTURE FOR AN EVENT / RELATIONAL AESTHETICS / CRITIQUE OF REPRESENTATION / AUTHORSHIP / FICTIONAL DOCUMENTARY / DEATH OF THE AUTHOR / POST-PORN / DRILL / POST-MODERNITY / REAL / RHIZOME / CROWD / ICON / NET · ART ...

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